Relief Oil

48414744_2027811947515986_1737161529310052352_nThis Oil was designed to be polarizing, similar to what most know or refer to as Icy-Hot, or Vapor rub. One oil is made with cooling herbs and essential oil’s and the other is made using warming herbs and oils. cooling herbs have a negative polarity, and warming herbs have a positive polarity.  Typically you would use the negative (cooling) when you want to direct energy away from the symptoms/issues etc. and you would use the positive (warming) when you want to direct energy to the symptom/issue etc. Additionally the herbs used in the two blends have their own added benefits. Available in both a liquid oil and a salve.

 

COOLING

Eucalyptus, Mint, Chamomile, Lavender, Thyme, Arnica + EO Eucalyptus, Mint, Lavender

The cooling oil is designed to work similar to vapor rub, to ease breathing, tension, and provide a mild gentle relaxant. The supporting herbs also help with: Inflammation, cough, cold, runny nose, muscle pain, exhaustion, fever, flu, kidney stones, respiratory issues, headache, singles, bronchitis, viral infections, scars and spots, skin rash,irritation,or infection; bruises, and broken surface blood vessels, mild antidepressant; anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-biotic and anti-fungal properties and more.

 

WARMING

Cayenne, Ginger, Arnica, Rosemary, Calendula + EO Ginger and Rosemary

The warming one is designed more like the hot properties of an icy-hot. It creates a warming effect which stimulates the circulatory system bringing oxygen rich blood to the area of concern. The supporting herbs also help with: muscle and joint pain, mood booster, nausea, relieve respiratory conditions, sinus relief, reduce inflammation, cold & flu, pain relief, wounds, fever, headache, congestion, skin rash,irritation,or infection; bruises, and broken surface blood vessels,  anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-biotic and anti-fungal properties and more.

Gypsy

c3789a411480533e25262a1d47e255b7This blend is made with the gypsy spirit in mind, care free, grounded yet mysterious in her own right.

Made from a blend of herbs more commonly wild harvested, and used in herbal smoking blends. (If you’re interested in it for this purpose please contact us) It has an earthy, cleansing aroma to it, and has numerous benefits for mind, body and soul.

We use this blend in making our smudge spray, as well as other herbal crafted remedies.


Blend Benefits and Uses:

expectorant, astringent, sedative, euphoric,  libido enhancing, demulcent, decongestant, antispasmodic, ulcers, diarrhea, pain killer, headaches, sleep issues, ear aches, anxiety/nervousness, dry cough, inflammatory respiratory conditions, whopping cough, immune boosting, cuts, burns, insect bites+more

Damiana

This isn’t a very commonly used herb, but this flower has many wonderful healing properties. Its a great herb for the Sacral Chakra as it helps with regulating hormones as well as increasing libido and performance. This herb has also been known to increase sperm count and strengthen eggs, it also helps to ease some of the symptoms of menopause.

Damiana’s properties help to calm the nervous system, reduce anxiety and depression helping to boost energy, reduce feelings of exhaustion or fatigue. It can be used to help treat asthma, bronchitis and other respiratory issues. It is also a mild herb which makes it great for treating stomach and digestive issues for any age.

Mullein

This stalky plant is full of great healing and immune boosting properties; it helps to soothe the gut, eases ulcers and diarrhea. Its an effective pain killer for headaches, and encourages sleep. It is a good herb for inflammatory respiratory issues including dry cough and whooping cough.

Sage

When you think sage your probably going to think smudging first and foremost. Personally I think of my grandmas garden. But this ‘spiritual’ herb is so much more than that; The Greeks called sage the ‘immortality herb’. It has antimicrobial, astringent, antiseptic, tonic, antioxidant and rejuvenation functions. It can help to improve appetite, aid digestion and the absorption of vitamins/minerals. It is a useful herb in regards to healthy liver and pancreatic function, as well as helps to eliminate toxins from the kidneys. It also has properties which make it helpful for reducing anxiety and lifting feelings of depression. It is another herb that is great for colds and chest infections.

Its a great herb to have on hand for cuts, burns and insect bites.

**Avoid this herb during pregnancy and breast feeding unless you have spoken to your preferred medical professional**

Mint

Known for its cooling properties this refreshing herb has been used for thousands of years as an herbal medicine, as well as added to bath water, cosmetics and food. It is a versatile herb that is great for many things including digestive concerns/upset. Inflamed/strained muscles and much more.

Sweet Marjoram

Marjoram is a perennial herb, similar to oregano, and more often used in cooking. They are sometimes used interchangeably but marjoram has a finer texture and a milder flavor profile. The use of marjoram can help to improve your digestion as well as digestive problems like nausea, flatulence, stomach cramps, diarrhea or constipation. This herb can help reduce the pain that often comes with muscle tightness or muscle spasms as well as tension headaches. It contains anti-inflammatory and calming properties which can be felt in both body and mind.

Marjoram is a great herb for women’s issues and hormonal imbalances. This herb is used as a traditional used to restore hormonal balance and regulate the menstrual cycle, provide relief of PMS or menopausal symptoms. Like hibiscus, it’s considered an “emmenagogue“. It’s also been used traditionally by nursing moms to promote breast milk production. Studies have also shown it to help with PCOS and related symptoms.

Marigold/Calendula

A flower most commonly bought for spring garden beds and often overlooked as a medicinal herb/plant. Easily identified by its bright color and daisy like appearance. this herb is high in  anti-inflammatory flavonoids. It is also used for its anti-septic, anti-fungal, and tissue healing properties. Marigold also encourages low lymphatic flow, helping the body rid itself of toxins, which make it useful for infections and swollen glands. Marigold has been used for treating menstrual issues as well, due to its blood cleansing effects.

Zen

I actually made this blend with a previously used shampoo in mind. It seemed like Rosemary & Mint kept coming up in discussion as well; about its benefit for helping with hair re-growth and strengthening, and although I don’t have plans to make a shampoo (I do know a great small business that does though)

I still loved the combination of herbs and I think they work so well together. This blend is reminiscent of Full Moon in Gemini, because of their shared Lemongrass and Rosemary, but the Mint and Thyme in this blend give it a special kind of earthy crisp aroma when mixing the dry herbs that I really love, and I hope you will too.


Uses/Benefits:
Antispasmodic, astringent, digestive, antiseptic, decongestant, circulatory, stimulant, relaxant, immune boosting, antioxidant, cuts/bites/wounds , muscle pain/tension, cooling/heating, liver, gall, kidney, concentration/memory, cold/flu, sleep issues. +more

Mint

Known for its cooling properties this refreshing herb has been used for thousands of years as an herbal medicine, as well as added to bath water, cosmetics and food. It is a versatile herb that is great for many things including digestive concerns/upset. Inflamed/strained muscles and much more.

Lemongrass

I love lemongrass, and honestly I believe it is an undervalued, under used herb, which is why I like to use it whenever I can.

Lemongrass helps to maintain healthy cholesterol levels, strengthen immune, and is an effective antiseptic. Lemongrass can help naturally reduce fever, and helps treat stomach and digestive disorders. It is a great herb for the Solar Plexus Chakra, and related body systems.

Additionally Lemongrass has been used to maintain healthy skin. It has the ability to cleanse and detoxify and helps the body to heal from colds and flu.  Lemongrass has antibacterial, antiviral and anti fungal properties which can kill or stifle growth of bacteria and fungi. It has antidepressant effects which make it a great, natural and safe option for those suffering from symptoms of depression; it is a great herb for new/postpartum mothers. Its calm and soothing effects make it a great option for treating headaches, and tense muscles by relieving pain, pressure, and tension.

Rosemary

The herb has been hailed since the ancient times for its medicinal properties. Rosemary was traditionally used to help alleviate muscle pain, improve memory, boost immune and circulatory system, and promote hair growth. Rosemary has a range of health benefits, it has Antioxidant and anti inflammatory compounds. It can be used in improving digestion, enhancing memory and concentration, neurological protection, prevent brain aging, and protect against muscular degeneration.

Thyme

Tiny leaves, that pack a powerhouse of healing. (insert the many time/thyme jokes here) This herb is often used in cooking, and its great for enhancing appetite, aiding digestion and stimulating the liver, as well as calming indigestion. It is effective in helping to relieve colic and trapped winds, as well as for helping treat IBS and related issues. It has a warming stimulating effect on the blood, helping to improve circulation. The volatile oils in this plant have powerful antibacterial, and anti fungal effects supporting the body to fight infections especially those in the respiratory, digestive and genitourinary systems. It is also effective for use for joints, muscle pains, cuts and wounds.

*avoid large amounts in pregnancy*

Winter Blues

We have all heard of or experienced the “Winter Blues” or  Seasonal Affective Disorder “SAD”; So how can you be proactive this season to keep the blues at bay?drew-coffman-174991-1280x429

First place to start is identifying what Seasonal Affective Disorder is, so What is S.A.D?

SAD is an acute (mild) form of depression brought on by the shift in seasons of autumn and winter; thought to be caused by decreased sunlight in your hemisphere. [Northern Hemisphere October-March/ Southern Hemisphere April-September (aprox.)]

About 1 in 30 Americans suffer from SAD and it is more common for women to display ‘severe’ symptoms.

Some studies suggest that their may be a genetic influence for those who experience reoccurring SAD (yearly.)

Key symptoms of S.A.D are (but not limited to):
*Uncharacteristic*

  • sadness, despair and irritability
  • hypersomnia, or increased sleep disturbance
  • low energy/ lethargy
  • decreased interest or attention
  • craving sweet and or starchy foods (carbohydrates)
  • weight gain
  • aches and pains especially in joints
  • withdrawl
  • increased or worsened anxiety

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What things can you do or incorporate into your life throughout the winter months to keep those blues away?

One thing you can do is start off by tracking your Circadian Rhythm. This (one of) your bodies natural clock(s) that runs on the amount of light we receive, and this can be altered by sun, as well as technology, both for the good and the bad.

sleep-wake-cycle

You can track the shift and changes in your own circadian rhythm simply by keeping journal for about a week or so about all your habits, sleeping, eating, bathroom, mood, reactions, cravings, literally and everything.  Simply write the time on left hand side of the page in 2 hour increments, and through out the day, make some notes about whats happening in your body and in your life. After a few days a pattern will start to show and you can use this to your benefit to engage or avoid based on your natural rhythm.


downloadAnother thing you can do to help with SAD and with altering your circadian rhythm for the better, is light therapy. This can be natural light, or the use of a light therapy bulb/box/device.

Fresh air and sunshine are natures medicine. Vitamin D (D3 is the bodies preferred type) is primarily absorbed by the skin and stored in fat cells. Since there is less sunlight both in strength and time during autumn/winter this is a key factor in the onset and reoccurance of S.A.D.  If you can not get outside for whatever reason, try to lay or sit in the sunshine through a window, and even open the window for a few minutes to give yourself a bit of refreshing cold air, which will help wake up your senses and can help you feel invigorated.

Light therapy blue+red bulbs and boxes are fairly inexpensive options if you feel light therapy is something you would benefit from and have an extremely limited amount of light. (IE. Alaska who gets 4-6h of sunlight during the winter)

[You can also supplement with vitamin D3 and an Omega 3/6 Fatty acid, they need each other to absorb and metabolize]


Fitness-nutrition/index (ts512686666)

Nutrition and Exercise…

are key players when it comes to anything in life, and S.A.D is no exception! Good Nutrition is key; as seasons shift and produce becomes less available and or affordable, we tend to lean on heavier carbohydrates/starches as well as sugars. This is one of the big contributors to ‘holiday’ weight gain as well as generally less movement. Fortunately for the majority of us, we have access to various ‘summer’ fruits and vegetables year round both fresh and frozen; There are however still a variety of winter vegetables you can take advantage of that are just as full of rich vitamins, minerals and other nutrients that your body needs, especially during the winter months.

Some of these include:

  • Celery
  • Potatoes (try to avoid white varies and opt for sweet, purple or yams)
  • California Kiwi
  • Horseradish
  • Kumquat
  • Meyer Lemon
  • Northern Spy Apples (apples in general are available year round)
  • Parsnips
  • Persimmon
  • Pink Grapefruit
  • Pomelo
  • Kale
  • Cabbages
  • Rutabaga
  • Black Eyed Peas
  • Winter Greens
  • Radish
  • Collard Greens
  • Blood Oranges
  • Clementines
  • & other root vegetables
[Source: IN SEASON by Rob Patrone and Robin Raisfeld ISBN: 978-0-399-16110-0]

tai-chi-sunriseKeeping active even 10-15 minutes of light exercise, can help keep the symptoms of S.A.D at bay and keep your body healthy. Some simple stretches, light yoga, t’ai chi, putting on a song or two and dancing, are all super easy ways to get moving that require little effort, space and time. Going for a nice walk around the block or out to get the mail can be refreshing and get your heart pumping.

Serotonin is one of your bodies feel good hormones, and it is important when it comes to gut health too. Since sugar and carbs are the easy ways for your body to get ‘quick’ energy, it also gives off serotonin which gives you that ‘feel good’ high. But sugar/carbs do not provide lasting energy, and can even perpetuate your stress cycle. The production of serotonin is another thing that gets effected by the decreased sunlight, causing it to slow down. When you exercise you positively stimulate the production and release of serotonin in the body. You can learn more about this here.


It is highly common for anti-depressants (SSRIs) to be prescribed during the winter months, even some of my family members have had to take medication to deal with SAD. If you feel you need to use medication please do your research to decide what is best for you in your situation; But there are a host of natural ways to deal with symptoms of Seasonal Affective Disorder including the above mentioned.

herbs-for-anxiety

Some Herbs that you can incorporate into your life during the winter months, or even long term if you suffer from other types of depressions are:

  • Wild Oat’s, Vervain, St.Johns Wort, Lemon Balm, Holy Basil, Rhodia
  • Essentials Oils of: Lavender, Rosemary, Chamomile, Mandarin, Ylang Ylang,
  • CBD has also been shown to be an effective plant based derivative that helps with treating depression. [Personally we choose to take one that has a combination of the a fore mention herbs known to treat anxiety/depression]

Some other great ways to help handle the symptoms related to SAD throughout the winter season are

  • Chiropractic
  • Massage Therapy
  • Energy Based Therapies ie. Accupuncture, Accupressure, Reflexology, etc.

These not only help to relax the body and reduce stress, but help activate the bodies natural healing abilities in various ways, and help to balance and release the bodies natural hormones responsible for mental-emotional regulation and more.


 

If you start to notice these symptoms creeping in or suffer from yearly S.A.D, I hope you will have found some helpful tips and trick to incorporate into your daily life.

I am always available for further recommendations via contact page or on social media.

 

Namaste

Katrina

Aromatherapy Dough

I don’t know about you but the smell of play doh makes me sick to my stomach and I feel so bad because Cas asks me to play all the time but all I do is gag…. Plus lord knows what’s in it anyway and judging from the smell, nothing good… and considering they say the ingredients list is “proprietary” and fail to disclose what is in it… I don’t know about you but, simply saying it’s “non-toxic” doesn’t cut it in my book.

So… being the crafty health conscious person I am, I whipped up two small batches of aromatherapy dough with about 6 ingredients including essential oils. *See bottom*

I made a yellow dough called Sunshine, which is mandarin and ylang ylang two great EOs for anxiety/stress. Because yes kids have stress too, and since sensory play is super important for young children why not add a little more health benefit for the olfactory senses.

Mandarin EO

Provides relief from inflammation and stress, purified blood and removes toxic substances from the body, promotes growth of new cells and tissues, strengthens liver and more. *Protects food from bacteria*

Ylang Ylang EO

Boosts mood and increases confidence, helps release stress and tension, helps balance hormones.


I also made a pastel green dough called, Spring Garden which is Rosemary and Lavender. It literally smells like your walking through a garden and it’s very relaxing to sit and play with.

Lavender EO

Calms skin conditions, calms and relaxes the mind, relieves tension and headaches. Antibacterial.

Rosemary EO

Soothes muscle aches and pains, reduces nervous tension and fatigue.


I’m honestly not one to use much of Essential Oils, for a few reasons… but for things like this it tends to be a better option as the aroma is stronger and there is less chance for mold to develop vs using an herbal decoction which takes more water and has less aroma.

Both are heavenly and the consistency is a lot nicer to play with, its soft and malleable when warmed by your hands and stiffens as it cools back down to room temp. (Thanks to the corn starch)

Aromatherapy sensory dough is super easy to make. Depending on how much your child plays with it it can last 3+ months as long as it’s kept in an air tight container.

The benefit of adding essential oils is not only for the pleasant and natural healing aromas but also lends their healing properties subtly through the skin as well as keeping away the bacteria from the dough allowing it to last a little longer without other preservatives.

If you wish you can add vitamin E oil which is a natural preservative. or you may choose to cook the dough as well which helps it to last a little longer.



To make the dough:

Mix plant based food coloring into 1/2 c Luke warm water.

Add in 1 C of flour and 1/2c (non gmo) corn starch mix, it will be very soft and almost a foamy consistency.

Add 1/4 sea salt and 1 tsp cream of tar tar* (*not necessary but helps it from drying out)

[You may choose to cook the dough if you wish but I do not always cook it since we go through it quickly, you may need to add more coconut oil, water and flour, wait until cool before adding in EOs]

Add in 5 drops of each Essential Oil you wish to use – you can also add 1 tbs of coconut oil.

Add 1/2c of flour and continue to mix, continue adding 1/4 cup of flour until it reaches a dough like consultancy that is good to play with. (If cooking, add flour while mixing/cooking until consistency is thicker)

Add vitamin E as a preservative if you wish about 4-5 drops.

Store in air right container and label.

Should last 2+ months with moderate use and proper storage. If dries out add more water or make a new batch. If too sticky add more flour or corn starch and kneed until smooth.

If odor or mold develop throw out immediately!



* THIS IS AVAILABLE FROM US BY REQUEST ONLY *

Namasté and Happy Playing

Just a Phase Holistic Healing & Raw’n Wild Collective

‘Stellar Roots’ Tonic

I’m not sure how many of you will remember the video I did when I spoke about my pregnancy and related health issues or even how many are aware at all of what happened to me. So I will summarize below…

For most of my life I had mild stomach issues, it’s something genetic on my mothers side we’ve never been able to explain, and my mother had a tilted stomach from a childhood accident for at least 35y of her life. When I became a teen and to this day I struggle with acne, it’s moved around a lot, and even during pregnancy it never let up. Most of the time it’s been concentrated in the areas of my liver, stomach, lungs and gall bladder.

reflexology-bright

When I went to college they refused my religious and medical exemption and pretty much forcibly gave me hep-b vaccine, which only lent to aggravate my already taxed detox system. For at least 3 months I was walking around in a sick zombie-like mode with no explanation. Flash forward to 20, I was pregnant with my son, and for most of my pregnancy I was complication free, but come 34 weeks, I developed a serious issue (ICP) and my liver and gall bile (salts) were flooding my blood because they couldn’t handle the load of detoxing, causing not only uncomfortable symptoms for myself but putting my child at danger of still birth.

Even after birth, my stomach, liver and gall continued to have issues off and on, aggravated by food, environment, products etc, although I can never seem to pin point anything specific other than at some point my body becomes too taxed with detoxing and various symptoms will flare up. Most of these symptoms, I hardly notice anymore I’ve lived with them so long. I’m always on the hunt for a natural way to not only remedy the symptoms but to aid my body in healing naturally.

Among my research for other things I’ve found that cranberry, hibiscus, cinnamon and honey, all have similar properties that aid in remedying not only the areas I was in need of, but also a lot of other beneficial uses.


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Stellar Roots Tonic


See bottom of page for directions or ordering info


Antiseptic, Expectorant,  Fatigue, Headache, Pain, anti-inflammatory, aphrodisiac, PMS/Menses/Menopause, Antiviral, Antibacterial, Stiff Muscles, Carminative, antiemetic, antimicrobial,warming, diaphoretic, circulatory stimulant,  antioxidant, acne, liver protectant +more

This Tonic helps with:

  • Immunity boosting
  • Oral problems
  • Preventing and treating UTI and kidney/bladder related conditions
  • Reduces risk of cancer
  • Increases bone strength
  • Improves cardiovascular function
  • Improves skin
  • Protects liver against infection and disease as well as aids in liver detox
  • Helps with weight-loss / weight regulation
  • Antioxidant
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Removes Radiation from the body
  • Digestive Aid, as well as protects from and treats ulcers
  • Colon Health
  • Reduces anxiety, depression and improves mental health

img_6656Cranberry

Probably best known for their jelly at Thanksgiving, or Juice/ tablets for dealing with a UTI; but this tart little berry is so much more. Many herbal practitioners also recommend it for kidney, and bladder stones, incontinence, and even prostate problems. Its also been shown to help prevent bacteria-induced stomach ulcers, lower bad cholesterol and inhibit the growth of some cancers; among everything else mentioned above.

Cranberry juice is usually pretty accessible, as well as dried or fresh cranberries depending on the year, adding these into your diet, does help to provide you with its many healing abilities. Just be cautious of any coloring additives, or added sugars.

*The Tonic I have developed is made with a concentrated decoction made from raw cranberries, as well as the below listed herbs/spices.

15680a55-6242-42fa-8fd9-fe04353246de-19579-00000479c782adc1Hibiscus

Known to lower blood pressure, supporting healthy cholesterol, and triglycerides. Hibiscus is full of antioxidants that fight free radical damage caused by poor diet and constant exposure to dangerous chemicals and thus can help maintain a healthy gut microbiome.  It has also been used to naturally treat depression and related symptoms such as fatigue, feelings of hopelessness, loss of interest in hobbies and more.

It also helps to boost the immune system, preventing colds and flu; It also aids in digestion, as well as protects the liver against infection and disease.

Hibiscus also helps to regulate menstrual flow and natural cycle. There are some concerns regarding its use for pregnant and nursing moms, but this is generally in regards to drinking a lot of hibiscus tea which can, but rarely, cause emmenagogue effects aka menstruation. Use with caution and moderation in this regard.

(This tonic uses a relatively small and safe amount, but always use your own intuition)

04583192-2fe5-4228-95b7-9b32082add38-19579-00000479eefe1c0eCinnamon

A commonly used household spice, holds some healing powers of its own. It is able to clear mucus from the lungs and sinus’ and can aid in breaking a fever. It stimulates blood circulation to the digestive system and to the extremities which is a common indication of a weak gut. It has powerful astringent properties as well as antimicrobial and can be used to treat gastric related conditions.

Additionally it regulates blood sugar, helps to balance hormones, helps to heal the skin clearing acne and other inflammatory skin conditions, has anti-carcinogenic properties, kills candida, and supports the immune system.

**Cinnamon should not be used in the case of severe liver issues.**

Honey

95abbba8-1846-49a3-bf06-f2038e470293-19579-0000047a270d9c77Honey helps to treat a multitude of conditions and its really a miracle food. It helps treat conditions such as: Insomnia, Indigestion, Coughs, Colds, Headache, Fatigue, Anemia, Acne, Ringworm, and Eczema.

Honey contains a number of Vitamins, Enzymes and other nutrients beneficial for your over all health. It has anti-viral and anti-fungal properties, and contains powerful antioxidants. Its also great for treating and eliminating allergies, boosting immune functions and promotes digestive health; its also great for healing various skin conditions such as acne.



So as you can see adding theses simple herbal remedies into your diet, really in any form lends their magnificent healing powers to your body allowing it to support and heal itself naturally.

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There are so many ways to use cranberries most of which Involves baking, and with the winter months ahead and cranberries in ready supply what a great time to throw them in all your various dishes to lend a sweet-tart flavoring and their healing properties.

Hibiscus is typically used as a tea and you can usually find it in a pre-made tea either on its own or in a blend.

Cinnamon and Honey are always readily available year round, even mixing these together in some warm water makes for a simple yet effective tonic like drink/tea.

It’s best to source your honey from a local farm or beekeeper within 10-15 miles or less from where you live so that you are being exposed to your local flora which will help with dealing with any seasonal allergies. You’ll also be supporting your local economy, and environment; most cheap honeys sold in store are not 100% honey and are often mixed/diluted with High Fructose Corn Syrup, and other additives. If you are unsure of local bee-keepers you can trust, opt to use this service provided by the National Honey Board, or ask in your local groups.

Namastè

Katrina


TO MAKE THIS HEALING TONIC

Bring raw cranberries about 1/2 cup to a boil together with 1/4 cup dry hibiscus/sorrel and a cinnamon stick (don’t use powdered as it will create globs as it cools.)  in 16oz of water (about 1 water bottles worth or 2c)

Reduce heat and simmer for minimum of 1 hour.

using a strainer, push as much of the liquid out of the cranberries and hibiscus.

Place all liquid back into the pot and add 2 more cups of water and 2-4 cups of raw sugar (depending on if you want a syrup or more fluid elixir) , and 2 tbs of black strap molasses (added trace minerals)

Bring to a boil and let thicken over about 15 minutes, longer if you are making a syrup.

Remove from heat and let cool to near room temperature, once cooled add 1/4 cup of honey (or agave or skip this step) it is important that the mixture be cooled before adding honey so as not to loose its healing properties, if it is boiled it reduces it to a simple sugar which is why you use raw sugar during the boiling process.

Transfer into a swing top bottle, and store in the fridge for up to 3 months.

Personally I take on an empty stomach before meals. But use as you see fit for your needs.


If you would like to purchase this it is *available by request only* in 8 or 16 fl.oz sizes – Please message me via my contact page, Facebook Page, or email.


sources:
https://draxe.com/cranberries/
https://draxe.com/health-benefits-cinnamon/
Chown, Vicky, and Kim Walker. The Handmade Apothecary: Healing Herbal Remedies. Sterling Ethos, 2018.
National Geographic Guide to Medicinal Herbs: the World’s Most Effective Healing Plants, by Rebecca L. Johnson et al., National Geographic, 2014
McIntyre, Anne. Herbal Remedies for Everyday Living. Bounty, 2015.


Ginger

‘Zingiber Officinale’


Antiemetic, carminative, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, circulatory stimulant, expectorant. 
Colds, flu, sinus infections, poor circulation, arthritis, colic, nausea, diarrhea, weak digestion, painful menses. 

This tuberous plant is used both in cooking and herbal medicine, hailed for its use in treating digestive issues, including nausea and diarrhea.

In Sanskrit the name for ginger vishwabhesaj, which means universal medicine; which seems quite fitting for all its amazing healing abilities.

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Crystalized Ginger is a sweet and easy way to provide digestive aid for the whole family

Ginger is principally a warm herb, with a clean, semi sweet, zesty heat that lends its healing qualities to treating colds, flue and sinus infections. Ginger stimulates the circulatory system, improving blood supply to the extremities.

There are many ways to use ginger; raw or cooked when preparing meals, as a tea, infused into oil, as a tincture, candied etc.  No matter the way you ingest ginger, its wonderful healing properties start working almost immediately.

Its not totally understood how ginger works; but it is believed that the compounds in ginger bind to receptors in the digestive system to relieve symptoms such as nausea and aid in digestion even reducing the time in which food sits in the stomach. Similar compounds have been shown to destroy many of the virus’ that cause cold and flu.

2614-Take-Ginger-And-Say-Good-Bye-To-High-Blood-Pressure-Once-And-For-All-ssGinger is one of the best and well known “herbal” or ‘home’ remedies for digestive issues; it has been known to lessen feelings of nausea associated with motion sickness, and morning sickness in pregnancy.

Its antiseptic properties allow it to help in treating infections and imbalances within the digestive tract. Traditionally ginger is used medicinally to reduce pain and inflammation associated with arthritis and ulcerative colitis.

Ginger is safe for all ages, although it may cause heartburn in some; It is suggested that pregnant women should not take more than 1gram of dried ginger daily. As well, those whom are on any prescription blood thinners should use ginger sparingly, unless they’ve spoken to their Doctor/Nautropath.


Our family has very sensitive pallets and often raw or even cooked ginger can be overwhelming to us. We also tend to have digestive issues here and there, so I’m always looking for things to incorporate into your diet to ease digestive upset. My husband more so, has recently been having issues regarding stomach ulcers, he has been using various natural remedies including, mild candied ginger to help ease symptoms and heal his stomach and digestive tract. My son, actually to my surprise loves these natural little candies, and I’ve found they have a laxative type effect with him.

Something I regularly make for my son is Ginger-Cinnamon cookies. These are soft, sweet but mild spice, and easy to eat and digest. I’ve made them so much I don’t really have a recipe but below is how I generally make them, you can easily substitute any ingredients per dietary needs.

I previously wrote it up on my other blog https://awarriorinwildflowers.wordpress.com/2017/11/22/gingerbread/

3tbs Butter, 1/4c raw cane sugar, 1/4 black strap molasses. Cream these together, will become kind of stiff from the molasses. Add powdered cinnamon and ginger to desired taste. Add in 1/4c of egg white, or 1 whole egg or 2 yokes. Add 1/2tbs of baking powder and 1/4tsp of baking soda. Add in 1/2c of almond flour, 1/4c oat four (just blend oats until fine) and add in all purpose or whole wheat flour until it’s reached short bread consistency. Place on a mat and kneed for a few minutes, roll out and cut out shapes, I use a jar lid. Cook on 350* for 10-12 minutes.

~Katrina
Holistic Therapist

| SHOP |


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Definitions:

Antiemetic – lessens or stops nausea and vomiting

Carminative – Herbs that contain aromatic compounds; these aid digestion and reduce digestive discomforts, from spasm and wind.

Anti-inflammatory – Reduces Inflammation

Anti-microbial – Destroys or prevents the growth of microorganisms such as viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites

Circulatory stimulant – Stimulates and strengthens the heart and blood vessels.

Expectorant – Supports the removal of excess mucus and catarrh of the respiratory system.


Sources:
“Ginger.” The Handmade Apothecary: Healing Herbal Remedies, by Vicky Chown and Kim Walker, Sterling Ethos, 2018, pp. 165.
“Ginger.” National Geographic Guide to Medicinal Herbs: the World’s Most Effective Healing Plants, by Rebecca L. Johnson et al., National Geographic, 2014, pp. 158–161.